Franklin's Thirteen Virtues

Without scripture to fall back on, how do we determine how we ought to live and understand the world?
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Rick
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Franklin's Thirteen Virtues

Unread post by Rick » December 16th, 2018, 7:15 am

How do you feel about Benjamin Franklin's "thirteen virtues"? I've always admired them -- dating back to when I was a Christian -- but never made a concerted effort to apply them to my life.

I would love to raise my daughter with a solid framework of virtuous behavior -- behavior that is good to herself and to others, moral, ethical, not "righteous" in regards to sin but righteous in her treatment of everyone, that she might be excellent to others. And certainly, I would need to get some of my acts together to be a better model!

I'm just curious if you've ever practiced or meditated on these virtues before, and I'm also curious who you'd use as more appropriate persons for the last entry -- Jesus never existed, after all.
Benjamin Franklin wrote:Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation.

Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation.

Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time.

Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve.

Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing.

Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions.

Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly.

Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty.

Moderation. Avoid extremes; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve.

Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation.

Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable.

Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dullness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation.

Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.


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Rick
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Re: Franklin's Thirteen Virtues

Unread post by Rick » December 20th, 2018, 6:51 am

I'd average it out with one of the next statements: "never to dullness."

So long as its enjoyed, is pleasurable, and is above all mutually consensual, you're good. But to the point of being bored with it or making it into a chore or whatever, that's one extreme of the spectrum. (The other extreme would be something like "abstinence is good, mmmmkay.")


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Re: Franklin's Thirteen Virtues

Unread post by Noah Spersions » January 24th, 2019, 6:55 am

Rick wrote:
December 16th, 2018, 7:15 am
How do you feel about Benjamin Franklin's "thirteen virtues"? I've always admired them -- dating back to when I was a Christian -- but never made a concerted effort to apply them to my life.
I don't usually think in terms of something being a virtue or not. I think even christians *want* to be considered good generally speaking. So, I muddle through life being all I can be. ;)

The ironic thing to me is all throughout written history men have written truisms, or expounded on moving away from our baser nature. Many of these things are remarkably similar and predate the bible by a good bit. Take Hammurabi's Stele for instance.
Slander
Ex. Law #127: "If any one "point the finger" at a sister of a god or the wife of any one, and can not prove it, this man shall be taken before the judges and his brow shall be marked (by cutting the skin, or perhaps hair)."[24]
Trade
Ex. Law #265: "If a herdsman, to whose care cattle or sheep have been entrusted, be guilty of fraud and make false returns of the natural increase, or sell them for money, then shall he be convicted and pay the owner ten times the loss."[24]
Slavery and status of slaves as property
Ex. Law #15: "If any one take a male or female slave of the court, or a male or female slave of a freed man, outside the city gates, he shall be put to death."[24]
The duties of workers
Ex. Law #42: "If any one take over a field to till it, and obtain no harvest therefrom, it must be proved that he did no work on the field, and he must deliver grain, just as his neighbor raised, to the owner of the field."[24]
Theft
Ex. Law #22: "If any one is committing a robbery and is caught, then he shall be put to death."[24]
Trade
Ex. Law #104: "If a merchant give an agent corn, wool, oil, or any other goods to transport, the agent shall give a receipt for the amount, and compensate the merchant therefore, he shall obtain a receipt from the merchant for the money that he gives the merchant."[24]
Liability
Ex. Law #53: "If any one be too apathetic to keep his dam in primly condition, and does not so keep it; if then the dam break and all the fields be flooded, then shall he in whose dam the break occurred be sold for money, and the money shall replace the crops which he has caused to be ruined."[24]
Divorce
Ex. Law #142: "If a woman quarrel with her husband, and say: "You are not congenial to me," the reasons for her prejudice must be presented. If she is guiltless, and there is no fault on her part, but he leaves and neglects her, then no guilt attaches to this woman, she shall take her dowry and go back to her father's house."[24]

Ex. Law #196: "If a man destroy the eye of another man, they shall destroy his eye. If one break a man's bone, they shall break his bone. If one destroy the eye of a freeman or break the bone of a freeman he shall pay one gold mina. If one destroy the eye of a man's slave or break a bone of a man's slave he shall pay one-half his price."[24]

Adultery

Ex. Law #129: "If the wife of a man has been caught lying with another man, they shall bind them and throw them into the waters. If the owner of the wife would save his wife then in turn the king could save his servant."[27]

Perjury

Ex. Law #3: "If a man has borne false witness in a trial, or has not established the statement that he has made, if that case be a capital trial, that man shall be put to death."
[citation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Hammurabi]
What a co-inkydink that someone in the bible decided to write some stuff on stone tablets and call them "commandments". Deju-vu all over again.


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