Random Street Epistimology Questions For Christians

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Re: Random Street Epistimology Questions For Christians

by Rick » January 20th, 2019, 6:37 am

Noah Spersions wrote:
January 17th, 2019, 10:26 am
There's science that suggests that your mind has made a decision before you're conscious of it. I'm not sure where the link is right now, but there's a whole study on it.
Very true! Sam Harris has written about this, particularly in his book "Free Will."

It makes sense in a naturalistic universe. Our brains must obey chemistry just like any other clump of molecules in the universe, so if we're "making decisions," we're doing so because the molecules in our brain are reacting to whatever stimuli are before us. This all happens before those thoughts become conscious, at which point we feel like we're making a decision.

Déjà vu would be most likely caused by temporarily becoming aware of our subconscious thoughts as they're happening so that by the time our brain catches up to everything, we feel like those thoughts are memories rather than "current."

Knowing that every action has a natural cause and that our brains react as a complex collection of electrochemical processes to natural stimuli just as any other natural process, free will pretty much must be an illusion.

Re: Random Street Epistimology Questions For Christians

by Noah Spersions » January 17th, 2019, 10:26 am

Rick wrote:
January 17th, 2019, 8:04 am
1) The assumption of free will is a big one for certain stripes of Christian (such as Calvinists). Hell, as an atheist, I'm not even certain that we have free will.
They do bang on about free will don't they? I have Calvinist roots and so have always leaned toward non-free will myself. I'd offer Saul on the road to Tarsus as an example. There's science that suggests that your mind has made a decision before you're conscious of it. I'm not sure where the link is right now, but there's a whole study on it.
Rick wrote:
January 17th, 2019, 8:04 am
2) To play "Devil's advocate," the Proverbs do state that hands that shed innocent blood are hated by God. Christians view the unborn as the most innocent of all possible life, and so they want to protect it. Of course, this also ignores the common Christian belief of Original Sin and the fallenness of man, namely that there is no innocent blood (at least in the sight of God, which is what would absolve him from the deaths he caused in such as the flood).
It's a good thing Proverbs comes after the Pentateuch.
Rick wrote:
January 17th, 2019, 8:04 am
3) Goodness defined by God and in relation to God would include anything God does as good by definition. If God chooses to create people simply to watch them sin so that he can show off how wrathful he can be, who is the created to fret to the creator?
God to be god, innit? ;)
Rick wrote:
January 17th, 2019, 8:04 am
4) I firmly believe that they only suffering a Christian ought to cause is toward his or herself. The Bible says a Christian is to die to themselves so that Christ can live through them, and Christ wasn't really about living an extravagant life of fancy cell phones, oversized homes, multiple cars, and fine clothes. He gave all he could to those in need around him, then challenged his followers to do better. If there were one billion "real Christians" (and for this argument, honestly, screw the "No True Scotsman" thing -- the religion of Christianity and the prototype guidelines of what makes a Christian in the Bible are two drastically different things), there would be no suffering in this world today except that which can't be resolved by human compassion. Imagine an "army" of hundreds of millions of people willing to sacrifice what they can at a moment's notice to ensure everyone has enough to eat, a roof over their head, clothes to wear, someone to talk to when imprisoned or hospitalized, and so on. That to me is the greatest fault of the Christian religion: It makes spectacular claims about how Christians are the salt of the earth, but then presents to us a people who are more concerned with what gays do with their wangdoodles behind closed doors than they are about the sick, lonely, destitute, hungry, imprisoned...
Indeed. Words to live by!
Thanks for commenting Rick.

Re: Random Street Epistimology Questions For Christians

by Rick » January 17th, 2019, 8:04 am

1) The assumption of free will is a big one for certain stripes of Christian (such as Calvinists). Hell, as an atheist, I'm not even certain that we have free will.

2) To play "Devil's advocate," the Proverbs do state that hands that shed innocent blood are hated by God. Christians view the unborn as the most innocent of all possible life, and so they want to protect it. Of course, this also ignores the common Christian belief of Original Sin and the fallenness of man, namely that there is no innocent blood (at least in the sight of God, which is what would absolve him from the deaths he caused in such as the flood).

3) Goodness defined by God and in relation to God would include anything God does as good by definition. If God chooses to create people simply to watch them sin so that he can show off how wrathful he can be, who is the created to fret to the creator?

4) I firmly believe that they only suffering a Christian ought to cause is toward his or herself. The Bible says a Christian is to die to themselves so that Christ can live through them, and Christ wasn't really about living an extravagant life of fancy cell phones, oversized homes, multiple cars, and fine clothes. He gave all he could to those in need around him, then challenged his followers to do better. If there were one billion "real Christians" (and for this argument, honestly, screw the "No True Scotsman" thing -- the religion of Christianity and the prototype guidelines of what makes a Christian in the Bible are two drastically different things), there would be no suffering in this world today except that which can't be resolved by human compassion. Imagine an "army" of hundreds of millions of people willing to sacrifice what they can at a moment's notice to ensure everyone has enough to eat, a roof over their head, clothes to wear, someone to talk to when imprisoned or hospitalized, and so on. That to me is the greatest fault of the Christian religion: It makes spectacular claims about how Christians are the salt of the earth, but then presents to us a people who are more concerned with what gays do with their wangdoodles behind closed doors than they are about the sick, lonely, destitute, hungry, imprisoned...

Random Street Epistimology Questions For Christians

by Noah Spersions » January 15th, 2019, 3:24 am

1. If it’s the case that heaven and hell are the only two options in the end, and someone desires neither, do they still ultimately have free will?

2. Why take a position on abortion if it could be Jesus’ will in the same way it was Jesus’ will in Noah’s flood to drown toddlers, babies, and the unborn?

3. How can an ‘all good’ deity be ALL good if sin is a byproduct of his creation?

4. Would you prefer that everyone on earth converts to Christianity and the level of human suffering stays the same or that everyone on earth becomes an atheist and the level of human suffering falls 90%?

5. How could I tell the difference between someone who actually knows their purpose in life according to god and someone who just believes they know their purpose from god?

6. If god actually didn’t have a plan, and he was letting things just run their course, how could you tell the difference?

Discuss! 8-)

Credit2 AdamDoesSE on twitter

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